Press releases

Partnership makes plan to improve mental health care in Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire

Services and organisations across Nottinghamshire have developed an action plan for improving care for people in a mental health crisis in response to the standards set out in the Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat.

 

Seven Nottinghamshire clinical commissioning groups, the Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, primary care, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, East Midlands Ambulance Service, Nottinghamshire Police, Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire County Councils as well as a number of third sector organisations came together at an event last September in a declaration of support for the Concordat and have now developed a joint plan of action for how they will work together to improve services.

The Mental Health Crisis Care Concordat is a national agreement between services and agencies involved in the care and support of people in crisis. It sets out how organisations will work together better to make sure that people in crisis receive urgent mental health care. In February 2014, 22 national bodies involved in health, policing, social care, housing, local government and the third sector came together and signed the national Concordat. It focuses on four main areas:

  • Access to support before crisis point
  • Urgent and emergency access to crisis care
  • Quality of treatment and care when in crisis
  • Recovery and staying well.

Locally, the Crisis Care Concordat has already prompted a number of improvements across Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire, including commissioning mental health awareness training and the award winning Street Triage pilot, demonstrating partnership working at its best with a significant reduction in the use of section 136. Additionally, a Crisis House was opened in January 2015 in partnership with Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust and Framework Housing Association. From April there will continue to be a focus on developing and improving services for children and young people.

At a meeting this week of local partners, hosted by Police and Crime Commissioner Paddy Tipping, the Commissioner said: “It’s vital that people in mental health crisis receive appropriate care and I’m clear that this is not being held in a police custody cell - illness is not illegal. I have always believed that different agencies should work together to improve the way overall services are delivered so this progress is both pleasing and reassuring.”

Ruth Hawkins, Chief Executive at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, said: “Working with our partners is essential to make sure that when people experience a mental health crisis they have quick and easy access to the right care and support. We are very pleased to have signed up to this action plan, which marks an important step in services working together to achieve this.”

Dawn Smith, Chief Officer at Nottingham City CCG, on behalf of all CCG partners said: “This is a real achievement and testament to the benefits of partnership working. All those involved have shown a real commitment to improving the way we care for those in mental health crisis and to making it easier for them to get the help and support they need.”

Paul Farmer, Chief Executive of Mind, the mental health charity, said: “We are really pleased to see organisations getting together locally to work out how they will improve the care of people in mental health crisis. We know that where excellent crisis care exists, it saves lives, but too often people fall through the cracks between different services and don’t get the help they need. Local health services, local authorities, the criminal justice system and voluntary organisations must deliver a joined-up service and learn from each other to truly provide the best possible care.”

For more information about the Concordat, visit www.crisiscareconcordat.org.uk 

Published: 8 April 2015